vincentvangogh-art:

Farmer with straw hat, 1888
Vincent van Gogh

vincentvangogh-art:

Farmer with straw hat, 1888

Vincent van Gogh

soflawedandrunkandperfectstill:

“The fact that it seems like a lot of my songs are… what’s the word, ‘dark’? – is definitely a problem to me. It’s not like I want to carve out a little corner and stay there. Happy songs are great when they come along. I mean, they haven’t come along a lot. Now I’m glad. I’m just happy right now. Drinking too much will really depress anybody. But sometimes people drink too much because they’re really depressed. It’s hard to say what the cause is.”
Elliott Smith

soflawedandrunkandperfectstill:

“The fact that it seems like a lot of my songs are… what’s the word,
‘dark’? – is definitely a problem to me. It’s not like I want to carve out
a little corner and stay there. Happy songs are great when they come along.
I mean, they haven’t come along a lot. Now I’m glad. I’m just happy right
now. Drinking too much will really depress anybody. But sometimes people
drink too much because they’re really depressed. It’s hard to say what the
cause is.”

Elliott Smith

(via elliottsmithob)

Kurt Cobain photographed by Jesse Frohman

(Source: hanniballecters)

dailyrothko:

Mark Rothko

dailyrothko:

Mark Rothko

Tags: mark rothko

vincentvangogh-art:

Coal Barges, 1888
Vincent van Gogh

The railway yards were close to the Rhône River a few hundred yards from the Yellow House where van Gogh resided in Arles. In August 1888, van Gogh wrote his brother Theo: I saw a magnificent and very strange effect this evening. A very large boat laden with coal on the Rhône, moored at the quay. Seen from above it was all glistening and wet from a shower; the water was a white yellow and clouded pearl-grey, the sky lilac and an orange strip in the west, the town violet. On the boat, small workmen, blue and dirty white, were coming and going, carrying the cargo ashore.”
Van Gogh made at least 3 paintings and a number of sketches of the boats and workers in August 1888.

vincentvangogh-art:

Coal Barges, 1888

Vincent van Gogh

The railway yards were close to the Rhône River a few hundred yards from the Yellow House where van Gogh resided in Arles. In August 1888, van Gogh wrote his brother Theo: I saw a magnificent and very strange effect this evening. A very large boat laden with coal on the Rhône, moored at the quay. Seen from above it was all glistening and wet from a shower; the water was a white yellow and clouded pearl-grey, the sky lilac and an orange strip in the west, the town violet. On the boat, small workmen, blue and dirty white, were coming and going, carrying the cargo ashore.”

Van Gogh made at least 3 paintings and a number of sketches of the boats and workers in August 1888.

39adamstrand:

Hecky Brown (Zero Mostel) in The Front (1976) dir. by Martin Ritt and written by Walter Bernstein.  The scene is based loosely on the suicide of Mostel and Bernstein’s friend, Philip Loeb, who killed himself in the Taft Hotel in New York City on 1 September 1955 after being blacklisted as an alleged communist.


On 1 September 1955, blacklisted actor and director Philip Loeb took a room at the Taft Hotel in Manhattan and ended his life with an overdose of sleeping pills.
Loeb was at the height of his popularity in 1950, starring in The Goldbergs on TV, when a report on the “Communist Influence in Radio and Television” named Loeb as a Communist, a charge he denied. General Foods, the sponsor of the show, demanded that Loeb be fired.
In April 1952, director Elia Kazan named Loeb as a communist in his testimony before the House Un-American Activities Committee. Loeb was blacklisted and unable to find work.
Loeb was not a communist (a fact the FBI released after Loeb’s death), but he was a strong union advocate, and fought to get rehearsal pay and better salaries for all actors (the Actor’s Equity conference room is named in honor of Loeb and has a humanitarian award named after him.)
Loeb was the sole provider for his family, including a son with mental health issues, and Loeb became increasingly depressed about his ability to care for his family. He had last worked in 1953 and was falling deeper in debt.During his forced unemployment, Loeb lived for a time with his friend Zero Mostel (also blacklisted), who would later portray the character of Hecky Brown, loosely based on Loeb, in The Front (1976), starring Woody Allen and directed by Martin Ritt (blacklisted in 1952) and written by Loeb’s friend Walter Bernstein (blacklisted from 1951-1959).

On 1 September 1955, blacklisted actor and director Philip Loeb took a room at the Taft Hotel in Manhattan and ended his life with an overdose of sleeping pills.

Loeb was at the height of his popularity in 1950, starring in The Goldbergs on TV, when a report on the “Communist Influence in Radio and Television” named Loeb as a Communist, a charge he denied. General Foods, the sponsor of the show, demanded that Loeb be fired.

In April 1952, director Elia Kazan named Loeb as a communist in his testimony before the House Un-American Activities Committee. Loeb was blacklisted and unable to find work.

Loeb was not a communist (a fact the FBI released after Loeb’s death), but he was a strong union advocate, and fought to get rehearsal pay and better salaries for all actors (the Actor’s Equity conference room is named in honor of Loeb and has a humanitarian award named after him.)

Loeb was the sole provider for his family, including a son with mental health issues, and Loeb became increasingly depressed about his ability to care for his family. He had last worked in 1953 and was falling deeper in debt.

During his forced unemployment, Loeb lived for a time with his friend Zero Mostel (also blacklisted), who would later portray the character of Hecky Brown, loosely based on Loeb, in The Front (1976), starring Woody Allen and directed by Martin Ritt (blacklisted in 1952) and written by Loeb’s friend Walter Bernstein (blacklisted from 1951-1959).

fer1972:

Today’s Classic: Sisyphus Punishment

1. By Titian (1549)

2. By Alexandre Denis Abel de Pujol (1819)

3. By Franz von Stuck (1920)

4. Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones (1870)

5. By Antonio Zanchi (1665)

(via acknowledgetheabsurd)

"If you stare at the center of the universe, there is a coldness there. A blankness. Ultimately, the universe doesn’t care about us. Time doesn’t care about us. 
That’s why we have to care about each other."

— David Levithan, Every Day (via bookmania)

(via fading-fingerprints)