post-punker:

Ian Curtis of Joy Division, at Paradiso, Amsterdam, January 11, 1980, by Lex van Rossen

via

post-punker:

Ian Curtis of Joy Division, at ParadisoAmsterdam, January 11, 1980, by Lex van Rossen

via

theparisreview:

Cynthia Ozick’s stirring defense of Kafka, the man: “Whoever utters ‘Kafkaesque’ has neither fathomed nor intuited nor felt the impress of Kafka’s devisings. If there is one imperative that ought to accompany any biographical or critical approach, it is that Kafka is not to be mistaken for the Kafkaesque.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

Cynthia Ozick’s stirring defense of Kafka, the man: “Whoever utters ‘Kafkaesque’ has neither fathomed nor intuited nor felt the impress of Kafka’s devisings. If there is one imperative that ought to accompany any biographical or critical approach, it is that Kafka is not to be mistaken for the Kafkaesque.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

"I never saw a wild thing
sorry for itself.
A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough
without ever having felt sorry for itself."

Self-Pity by D.H. Lawrence (via oldfilmsflicker)

mexq:

from The Burmese Harp / ビルマの竪琴 Biruma no tategoto (Kon Ichikawa, 1956)

slutty-stoner:

Vladimir Mayakovsky ph. Alexander Rodchenko

slutty-stoner:

Vladimir Mayakovsky ph. Alexander Rodchenko

"Don’t let us forget that the causes of human actions are usually immeasurably more complex and varied than our subsequent explanations of them."

— Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Idiot (via fuckyeah-literature)

Yasunari Kawabata (14 June 1899 – 16 April 1972)

Yasunari Kawabata (14 June 1899 – 16 April 1972)

Yasunari Kawabata suffered a series of personal losses as a child. His father, a prominent physician, died from tuberculosis when Kawabata was 2, and his mother died the following year. Kawabata lost his grandmother and his only sister before he turned ten. These and other misfortunes explain the nickname—“master of funerals”—that was given to Kawabata at an early age.
Kawabata became the first writer from Japan to be awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature (1968). He condemned suicide in his Nobel Lecture: “However alienated one may be from the world, suicide is not a form of enlightenment. However admirable he may be, the man who commits suicide is far from the realm of the saint. I neither admire nor am in sympathy with suicide.” 
However, Kawabata had long suffered from poor health, and on 16 April 1972, two years after his friend Yukio Mishima’s suicide, Kawabata committed suicide at his home in Zushi by gassing himself. He left no note.

Yasunari Kawabata suffered a series of personal losses as a child. His father, a prominent physician, died from tuberculosis when Kawabata was 2, and his mother died the following year. Kawabata lost his grandmother and his only sister before he turned ten. These and other misfortunes explain the nickname—“master of funerals”—that was given to Kawabata at an early age.

Kawabata became the first writer from Japan to be awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature (1968). He condemned suicide in his Nobel Lecture: “However alienated one may be from the world, suicide is not a form of enlightenment. However admirable he may be, the man who commits suicide is far from the realm of the saint. I neither admire nor am in sympathy with suicide.”

However, Kawabata had long suffered from poor health, and on 16 April 1972, two years after his friend Yukio Mishima’s suicide, Kawabata committed suicide at his home in Zushi by gassing himself. He left no note.

Arthur Chevrolet (April 25, 1884 – April 16, 1946) was the brother of Louis and Gaston, born in Switzerland.  After Louis moved to American in 1901, he sent for his other 2 brothers.  Louis started the Chevrolet Motor Car Company in 1911.
Arthur was a noted mechanic and race car driver and competed in the First Indianapolis 500 in 1911, but only finished 30 lap.  The 3 brothers started the Frontenac Motor Company in 1916, designing racing cars.
Arthur had to stop competitive racing in 1920 when he was seriously injured in a practice round for the Indianapolis 500, which his brother Gaston won that year.  Gaston was killed in a racing accident a few months later.
By the 1930s, both Chevrolet brothers were broke and out of the automotive business. Louis returned to GM to work for the division that bore his name. Louis died in 1941 and Arthur suffered from depression at the loss of his brothers and his work.
Arthur Chevrolet hanged himself in Slidell, Louisiana.

Arthur Chevrolet (April 25, 1884 – April 16, 1946) was the brother of Louis and Gaston, born in Switzerland.  After Louis moved to American in 1901, he sent for his other 2 brothers.  Louis started the Chevrolet Motor Car Company in 1911.

Arthur was a noted mechanic and race car driver and competed in the First Indianapolis 500 in 1911, but only finished 30 lap.  The 3 brothers started the Frontenac Motor Company in 1916, designing racing cars.

Arthur had to stop competitive racing in 1920 when he was seriously injured in a practice round for the Indianapolis 500, which his brother Gaston won that year.  Gaston was killed in a racing accident a few months later.

By the 1930s, both Chevrolet brothers were broke and out of the automotive business. Louis returned to GM to work for the division that bore his name. Louis died in 1941 and Arthur suffered from depression at the loss of his brothers and his work.

Arthur Chevrolet hanged himself in Slidell, Louisiana.

Otho (Marcus Salvius Otho Caesar Augustus) was sent from Rome to Lusitania by Emperor Nero, when Nero took Otho’s wife for a mistress. Otho ruled Lusitania for 10 years before joining the rebellion against Nero, led by Galba.  Otho then organized the murder of Galba and was made Emperor in January 69.  His reign would only last 3 months.
Otho quickly learned that legions of the army who had declared allegiance to Vitellius were marching toward Rome. Otho quickly dispatched troops, but they were defeated. Otho spoke to his troops and said, “It is far more just to perish one for all, than many for one.” He then asked for two daggers.
Otho then retired and slept through the night, then in the morning of 16 April 69, Otho stabbed himself with a dagger and died. According to historian Cornelius Tacitus, “Some of he troops committed suicide beside the funeral pyre, not because they were beholden to [Otho] or feared his successor but because they loved their emperor and wished to share his glory.”

Otho (Marcus Salvius Otho Caesar Augustus) was sent from Rome to Lusitania by Emperor Nero, when Nero took Otho’s wife for a mistress. Otho ruled Lusitania for 10 years before joining the rebellion against Nero, led by Galba.  Otho then organized the murder of Galba and was made Emperor in January 69.  His reign would only last 3 months.

Otho quickly learned that legions of the army who had declared allegiance to Vitellius were marching toward Rome. Otho quickly dispatched troops, but they were defeated. Otho spoke to his troops and said, “It is far more just to perish one for all, than many for one.” He then asked for two daggers.

Otho then retired and slept through the night, then in the morning of 16 April 69, Otho stabbed himself with a dagger and died. According to historian Cornelius Tacitus, “Some of he troops committed suicide beside the funeral pyre, not because they were beholden to [Otho] or feared his successor but because they loved their emperor and wished to share his glory.”